Category Archives: Behind the Scenes

We’re Back! / URL news

Part 1: Sorry for the long delay, readers!

It’s the same old excuse as every other absence: Teaching and store, and this summer I’ve wanted to work on Chapters 18 and 19 rather than this blog. If you’re concerned that I’m abandoning this site, rest assured, I am not. Five months without a new post is no fun for you, like Shipwreck feeding you an orchard’s worth of apples. In fact, I’ve banked a few posts recently, so every week or so for the rest of the summer you can enjoy some rarely- or never-seen G.I. Joe artwork from the 1980s and ’90s!

arealamericanbookURL_BLOG

Part 2: Exciting web development news! Here’s a small upgrade I’ve been meaning to get around to for at least seven years:

arealamericanbook.wordpress.com is now

arealamericanbook.com!

arealamericanbookURL2_BLOG

Thanks to UX and web-person Jordyn Bonds, who also fixed my non-G.I. Joe website.

This probably doesn’t affect you, since any old links you’ve posted still work, but it’s less of a mouthful now — “What’s your favorite G.I. Joe blog?”

“ARealAmericanBook.com!”

Let’s all celebrate with this Wifi-Viper (NOT A REAL HASBRO CONCEPT), culled from the ranks of the best Tele-Vipers, as he looks over my WordPress code.

Tim Finn art of invented G.I. Joe figure, Wifi-Viper, to announce a small upgrade in his blog, A Real American Book!

Thanks for your patience! Back to regular posts in a few days!

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Index update – July 2018

Just a quick post that I’ve update the Index, so it’s easy to find the last two years’ worth of blog posts, and everything else that came before.

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A Real American Book! 2017 in Review

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Remembering Gary “Goggles” Head

Gary Goggles Head Tim Finn

Gary Goggles Head was my friend.

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Merrill Hassenfeld Obituary, 1979

Merrill Hassenfeld obit detail

Here’s an item that’s a little different than the art artifacts I usually show…  Continue reading

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G.I. Joe blog update – Feb 2014

Hi all, sorry it’s been quiet.  Busy with school and store.  Three items today.

1) I’m putting the finishing touches on my long-promised film review of G.I. Joe: Retaliation.  Should be up next week.

2) I’ve finished editing an audio podcast of a completely different film review of G.I. Joe: Retaliation.  This one’s me in conversation with editor Nick Nadel, and we talk about the Best Buy Blu-Ray Extended Action Cut.  Will post after the text review.

3) A Real American Book is on Twitter!  Follow me @GIJoeBook.  Don’t miss another update!

Thanks for your patience and your readership.  Here is a tiny doodle of Destro.

G.I. Joe sketch of Destro by Tim Finn

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Buy this book – America At War

America at War by Terence T Finn

Here. This is topical since the author is a) my father, and b) the second editor on my G.I. Joe book.

Terence T. Finn worked for NASA and the US Senate.  Later he spent eight years and read 150 of books to bring you America At War.  Each chapter covers one war we’ve fought and ends with a series of questions and answers (Did we have to drop the bomb on Hiroshima?).  Though the cover design makes it look like this is for adult males who watch the History Channel, it’s written for everyone — students, history lovers, lapsed history lovers, and the curious.

Fun fact:  I indirectly gave my dad the idea for the cover design.  My highest and most biased recommendation!  And if you’re in Somerville, MA, you can buy it at my store.

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Bazooka original dossier by Larry Hama

G.I. Joe Bazooka 1985 dossier Larry Hama teaseYou’ve probably seen this:

G.I. Joe Bazooka 1985 cardback dossier by Larry Hama It’s Bazooka’s 1985 toy cardback dossier, or “command file,” to use the official term.  Many fans know Larry Hama wrote these, so in addition to the monthly adventures from Marvel Comics, Hama was also influencing the Hasbro toys.  But before computers and the internet and .doc files and e-mail attachments, Hama’s originals would have been typewritten and faxed from New York to Pawtucket.  So you may not have seen this:

G.I. Joe Bazooka 1985 cardback original dossier by Larry Hama

You can even see the correction fluid.  (Certain typewriters had a second ribbon in white for fixing typos, many did not.)  This dossier is particularly interesting for Hama’s comment on outdated gear, and has his customary codename suggestions for Hasbro Legal to check.

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Interview – Flag Points Part One

In October I fired up my microphone and Skyped with Don and Dave of the G.I. Joe podcast Flag Points.  It’s pretty nerdy, but should appeal beyond a narrow band of hardcore toy Joe fans.  We talk about collecting, my book, and Hasbro, and we also make Star Wars and Transformers references.  And after I overmodulate for the first few minutes I back off from the microphone.  Perfect for those long drives or killing time on the treadmill.  We talked for so long they broke it in half.  You can stream or download to take with you.
http://flagpoints.podbean.com/2011/10/28/flag-points-10-part-1/

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The Comic That Changed Everything – Part One

Part One – Two Three FourFive – SixSevenEightNine

Because my mom didn’t want to cook dinner every night of the week, Wednesdays we ate out.  This tradition lasted for about 6 years.  We loved our local mall.  (Ironic since the growth of the suburban mall in the 1970s reflected the flight of retail stores from the American Downtown, a trend that closed my grandfather’s Baltimore department store years earlier.)  After a renovation that added an entirely new wing complete with 3-screen movie theatre, video arcade, and food court, Montgomery Mall had us hooked.  So after Mom came home from work she and brother Kevin and I would drive up the Beltway (the loop of interstate around Washington, D.C., and now the bane of many an automotive commuter) eager for a reliable night out in the consistent 72 degrees of our hermetic shopping experience.

After fast food dinner, we’d browse the book store and then split up – my mom to the department stores, and Kevin and I to – the arcade was actually called this, with a red and green neon sign – The Name of the Game.  A half-hour later we’d drive home in time to finish homework and watch whatever ABC sitcoms were dulling our senses that particular season.

In the June between 5th and 6th grade, while strolling into Waldenbooks, past magazines and bestsellers, I looked up at the two spinner racks of comics and saw a revelation.  His name was Road Pig.

The G.I. Joe cartoon had been in reruns for two years, a death spiral we could not fathom it pulling out of.  New toys continually refreshed the line, but they didn’t speak or move.  The explosions were imaginary, made in the onomatopoetic lexicon of little boys splayed out on a shag carpet.

From that top rack I pulled a comic book – odd thing it was – and noted several important elements:  A bold “G.I. JOE” logo.  The aforementioned Road Pig, a villain we had met in our role play, but never on television.  He was brandishing his cinderblock-on-a-stick, a weapon so bizarre that if new episodes were on the air we inherently knew it would not appear, much like Snake-Eyes’ sword, television restrictions being what they were.  On this cover image Road Pig was hauling two… who were they?  I didn’t actually know since they were out of costume, but I could tell they were older Joes, circa year one.  And a foreboding sign on the wall, pointing past them to something called the “Brain Wave Scanner.”  Whatever all of this was, it begged several questions and I was curious for the answers.

Opening this flimsy periodical offered more surprises and teases.  Over the first four pages, more characters who were too new to have appeared on the G.I. Joe cartoon!  And an entire panel where one group of them – the Iron Grenadiers with their ceremonial swords (like U.S. Marines in their dress blues) actually brandish them!  Threateningly!  At other villains!  It was too much for me to take.  The Iron Grenadier action figures did come packed with swords, but they were permanently sheathed.  So if Snake-Eyes was never going to use his sword on television (he did have it in hand once, but didn’t get to impale a robot or anything), and the Iron Grenadier toys made it physically impossible to properly use these other swords, that an “episode” of the G.I. Joe comic book had more relaxed rules concerning action and “violence” content made my eyes bulge.

And then a Cobra villain shoots another Cobra villain!  All before page 5!  (It was just a tranquilizer gun, but a kind of gattling tranq on steroids.)

But this was the icky G.I. Joe comic book!  Hadn’t I already tried this out with Yearbook #3 and #4?  Weren’t those printed on a dull newsprint, with a limited palette that could not rival the saturated intensity of animation cel vinyl photographed on 35mm film and telecined for broadcast?  Yes.  They were.  But there were a few more colors here than those earlier comics, (or perhaps a more adept color artist), and the pull of all these characters and actions that were not available on television overrode my aesthetic concerns.

I flipped back to the cover.  One dollar.  That was a lot, but it also wasn’t.  Kevin and I had a weekly allowance, and did not spend it on candy or gum.  Or prose books.  Those were all parental purchases.  We tended to measure money with our own private system:  The least expensive toys we bought were about three dollars.  At Toys”R”Us, that meant a single G.I. Joe action figure, or an Autobot minicar (like Bumblebee).  Everything scaled up from there in multiples of three and five.  A $12 or $15 Joe vehicle was possible after a few weeks or months of saving.  The $30 Metroplex was a bit out of my reach and became a birthday request.  The $100 U.S.S. Flagg aircraft carrier was an utter impossibility.  (Even the rich kid down the street didn’t have that, and he had a Millenium Falcon!)

So when I showed G.I. Joe issue #90 to my brother, his immediate response deflated, but did not surprise me:  “Cool.  Don’t buy it.”

Did I? Find out next week!

Part One – Two Three FourFive – SixSevenEightNine

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